After returning from California, after the cross country motorcycle trip, the discovery trip after my discovery of the Bahá’í Faith McLean, I went back to school. So in 1971 in Oxnard and Santa Barbara California, I decided I wanted to go back to school. I looked at options in California, but returning to Old Dominion University in Norfolk Virginia was the logical choice until I could do something better. So in the autumn of 1971 I returned to Old Dominion as a Bahá’í, no more counter-culture free living, it was time to decide what I was going to do with my life. Mostly I was oriented on the advice of the Huddlestons, and with a little help from Geoff Hougland, I transferred to Virginia Tech and started in the Agronomy/Soils Department.Click here to add your own text

Before getting to Virginia Tech, I remember mostly a period of self-study of the Bahá’í teachings. I read just about everything I could find in English. I also connected to other Bahá’í youth, and one that stands out is Francie Higgins White. She was raised a Bahá’í and I used to tell her how lucky she was, and how many things are “natural” to her because of her family, and how many things I had to work hard to achieve.Click here to add your own text

I decided to start playing the violin in Norfolk, and continued on and off up to the present. And that is the reason I don’t play well. To play the fiddle well you have to start young, and never stop. But I did play student recitals in Norfolk, played in a quartet in Blacksburg, took my violin to Haiti and Ivory Coast and Starkville (but didn’t do much with it), played in the University symphony in Raleigh, played with a small group in Kandy, and I’m thinking to get serious in my dotage.Click here to add your own text

When I moved to Starkville/Virginia Tech I roomed with Geoff Highland, first in a house full of alternative types. Geoff and I made a soup on Sunday, and added to it all week. I eventually got tired of roommates and decided to lease my own flat, and sub-lease it to others with conditions! If they didn’t keep the place reasonable, I sent them packing. Besides Geoff, an Indian from Madras (Srivivasan), and a classical guitar player (forget his name) shared the basement flat until my marriage to Carolyn.

There is a song, “Almost heaven, West Virginia”. Blacksburg was near the border of West Virginia, the same culture, and it was heaven to me. I loved the mountains, the activities, the University, the life. The small Bahá’í community was close, loving, and mutually supportive. I’m forgetting names, but maybe they’ll come back one day. I remember Barbara and Jerry Craig, Bruce Cotton, 2 faculty members at Radford University, a engineer student, a forestry student, a student who played the bagpipes, etc.(forgot names).